Dunnington School

In 1865 at the crossroads in Dunnington the primary school was built.The children went to school at the age of five.Some left school at eleven to go to a grammar school in York and until 1963 the rest stayed atthe village school until they were fifteen and went to work. In 1969 a new school was built because the Victorian school was too small. The upper juniors stayed in theVictorian part and five to nines went to the new building. There were only three classes to begin with and one playground. Now in 1985 there are 230 children on roll. There is a head teacher and eight others. In 1986 the Victorian building will probably be closed. Ateleven most Dunnington children travel by bus five miles to Fulford Comprehensive School.  Murton chrn.go to school in Osbaldwick.  http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/domesday/dblock/GB-464000-450000/page/12
 
In 1640 the assistant curate was also the schoolmaster, (fn. 42) and a schoolmaster was again mentioned in 1725. (fn. 43) In 1743 there were three unendowed 'English' schools in the parish. (fn. 44) No school was reported in 1764 (fn. 45) but a master was again mentioned in 1781 and later. (fn. 46) In both 1819 and 1835 there were three unendowed schools, containing in the former year 80-90 children and in the latter 109. (fn. 47) The churchwardens repaired the school-house several times in the 1820s (fn. 48) and they built a new school in the centre of the village in 1836. In 1864, when it was largely supported by school pence, the school contained 65 pupils. (fn. 49) It first received an annual government grant in 1864. (fn. 50) It was enlarged in 1905-6, (fn. 51) and from 1908 to 1936 the attendance varied between 105 and 142. In 1938 attendance was 98. (fn. 52) In the 1950s and 1960s the Methodist chapel schoolroom and the village reading room were used as additional classrooms. (fn. 53) A new school was built in 1969-70 in Church Lane (fn. 54) but in 1972 the former building was still used as well. In April 1972 the number of pupils on the roll was 324. (fn. 55)
In the 1860s an unsuccessful evening school was held. (fn. 56)
From: 'Dunnington ', A History of the County of York East Riding: Volume 3: Ouse and Derwent wapentake, and part of Harthill wapentake  (1976), pp. 5-12. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=22996  Date accessed: 21 February 2012.
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Brickwall Club,
22 Feb 2012, 05:54
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Brickwall Club,
22 Feb 2012, 05:54
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